Gwangjang Sijang Part 2: Food

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Jeon, buchimgae, jijimi- all the same things going by different names. They’re Korean savoury pancakes, made with anything from meat to veggies to kimchi. You cannot go wrong with these babies, trust me.

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Me derping by the import selection. Hersheys, Haribos, random Japanese sweets, Vitamin supplements- we got ’em alllll.

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Nom food moment, in front of a freaking sashimi stall! In the middle of a marketplace! I found that pretty cray.

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Sweetened azuki bean porridges, called danpatjuk. Sweet pumpkin porridge peaking its yellow face right behind it! Num.

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In line for the most famous bindaetteok place! With some cool middle aged dude. (who incidentally looked straight at the camera every time Sofie took a photo in the general direction of the place)

Grinding the mungbean.. photocreds to Sofie again!

Grinding the mungbean.. photocreds to Sofie

photocreds to Sofie!

photocreds to Sofie!

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Bindaettoek is a type of korean savoury pancake, made entirely with ground mungbeans, without any flour. Nope, that doesn’t promise a healthy, low-calorie, whatever dinner; guys. This stuff is freaking deep fried in oil. And its oh-so-good. Your waistline can sort itself out later. Who cares when you’ve got this baby in front of you?

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Fried, perfectly-crisped goodness. Soft, moist, and mushy on the inside, with the perfect crunch on the outside- especially dipped or eaten with the soysaucy onions, it is heaven.

We didn’t get to take enough pictures! But it’s also famous for its mayak kimbap (tiny versions of kimbap, eaten dipped in a special mustard sauce, literally meaning drug kimbap because it’s oh-so-addicting), bindaettoek, and soondae. (Korean blood sausage. Yup. Derp. But.. surprisingly yummy, to be perfectly honest.) Don’t be surprised to see piles of pig feet and pig faces (…) casually strewn about some of the stalls.

Overall, we really loved the place. It’s not fancy, it’s not the polished, snooty side of Seoul- it’s a place of humble, traditional Korean food and warmth. It’s a really homely place to come, bustling with people. Just don’t be too frightened by that piece of unidentifiable -or all too uncomfortably identifyiable- meat in the stalls.

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2 thoughts on “Gwangjang Sijang Part 2: Food

  1. omgosh these pictures are making me hungry! i’ve never been to korea before and i defintely want to go, all the things there seem so awesome!!!
    i can’t believe you’ve been reading my blog for 2 years ahha, I’d never have thought anyone would read my blog for that long !

    thank you so much for the comment, you’re very sweet!
    p.s i don’t know why but i swear I recognise you, did you go to my school?!
    xx

    • Ah thanks for checking out my blog! Haha yes yes you should definitely visit, cheap clothes & food galore (; if you check out my previous post, I wrote about a hugeee vintage market in Seoul!
      No problem, your blog is fabulous 🙂
      Aaah really?? Is your school, by any chance, an all-girl’s school with hideous turquoise jumpers and knee-length grey skirts? With a penguin-obsessed ex-headmistress? (If not, this must be sounding so odd right now, haha!)

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